There is no I in religion

5 March 2012

The sun was out in Utah this weekend. However, the son (of god) was being obscured.

As you well know by now, I was once an avid (and rabid) Christian. The last time I actively tried to participate in religion was when I began graduate school in the fall of 2004. (I say “tried” because I went to a Catholic mass and found that I was simply anxious and uncomfortable the entire time.) Nearly eight years on, I am still talking about religion and how damaging and infantile it is. (In case you missed it, I believe religion should have no role in politics and blame the unrelenting number of recent anti-abortion regulations on state-sanctioned Christianity.)

Last week, I began reading a book I should have read a couple of years ago: god is not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything by the late Christopher Hitchens.

The book sparked some great conversation with GF’s family over the role of and reason for religion and religious beliefs.

For me, the book pointed out that Christianity is not the only religion out there of which I should be critical. I often focus on Christianity in my critiques, but every religion ultimately is wrongheaded, misguided and immeasurably dangerous.

Because of the book, I began thinking about everything in which I do not believe. In much the same fashion as John Lennon’s “God,” I would like to list everything in which I do not believe.

I do not believe in:

  • god
  • religion
  • religious guilt
  • sin
  • spirituality
  • karma
  • hell
  • heaven
  • the afterlife
  • reincarnation
  • astrology
  • fate or destiny
  • eternity
  • humanity

However, much like John Lennon notes, I do believe in my loved ones and myself. That is about it. While I previously identified as atheist, I have to agree with Ricky Gervais that such a term should not even be necessary. Why should theism (or deism) be the default? I consider myself a-religious and a-spiritual—neither concept has any place in my life, my decisions or my morality (which, I might add, is far superior to the “morality” I claimed as a drooling, mind-numbed Christian).

So I’m curious, lovely reader—what do you believe? What do you not believe?

Well-read Lobster

10 September 2011

Good evening lovers and interlopers,

I am hungry for art.

In a fit of hunger, I recently purchased several books and compact discs:

Books

  • Nation of Rebels: Why Counterculture Became Consumer Culture by Joseph Heath and Andrew Potter
  • god is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything by Christopher Hitchens
  • Supergods: What Masked  Vigilantes, Miraculous Mutants, And a Sun God From Smallville Can Teach Us About Being Human by Grant Morrison
  • Improvise: Scene from The Inside Out by Mick Napier
Compact Discs
  • Scott by Scott Walker
  • Scott 2 by Scott Walker
  • Scott 3 by Scott Walker
  • Scott 4 by Scott Walker
  • Take Offs And Landings by Rilo Kiley
  • The Monitor by Titus Andronicus
I shall begin reading the books and listening to the cds (or possibly vice versa) and report back when ready.
In the meantime, hear and see the epic tale of two people starved for seafood.
GF and I wanted seafood a couple of weeks ago. We went to Baltimore to cure the craving, but came away having eaten no crab legs.
But, we still wanted crab legs.
One afternoon, after watching a commercial for Red Lobster’s Crab Fest, GF says, “I want a crab fest. I want a pound of crab. Bring it on.” I agreed.
Thus, we sought and found a Red Lobster in Alexandria, VA. Below is our journey in pictures.

GF waits for the Zipcar

I wait for the Zipcar

We made it! (Well, someone else made it, but we arrived.)

How do I feel about my dish?

This is how I feel.

Crab-ohydrates and more

Cancerian cadavers

Oh snap

Foot in mouth? Try a leg.